ISV (International Standard Version)

The ISV may be downloaded from its website.

On its website, the ISV is called:
“the most readable and accurate Bible translation ever produced”

Purchase the ISV New Testament
Purchase the ISV Old Testament Sampler

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11 Comments

  1. Wayne Leman
    Posted April 7, 2005 at 5:45 am | Permalink

    Luke 21:15 “for I will give you speech and wisdom”

    This is unnatural English: there is a collocational clash because the English lexicon does not sanction us putting the verb “give” with an object “speech” where there is also a recipient. In English we can draft a speech for someone. We can help them deliver a speech. We can also, of course, “give a speech” ourselves. But we cannot give someone speech.

    Suggested revisions (pending exegetical support): “give you the ability to speak” or “enable you to speak”

  2. Wayne Leman
    Posted April 16, 2005 at 10:30 pm | Permalink

    Matt. 21:5 “the daughter of Zion”

    Most fluent English (unless they are taught otherwise by Bible teachers) would understand this wording to refer to a female who is the daughter of someone named Zion. But this is not the biblical meaning of this Hebraic idiom, which is that this refers to inhabitants of the place called Zion. This is a case where a “transparent” translation communicates inaccurately to translation users, unless they are taught that the intended meaning is different from what the plain meaning of the translation seems to be.

  3. Wayne Leman
    Posted April 19, 2005 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

    The ISV words what its translators consider original biblical language poetry as English poetry. Here is a good example from Phil. 2:

    6 In God’s own form existed he,
    And shared with God equality,
    Deemed nothing needed grasping.
    7 Instead, poured out in emptiness,
    A servant’s form did he possess,
    A mortal man becoming.
    In human form he chose to be,
    8 And lived in all humility,
    Death on a cross obeying.
    9 Now lifted up by God to heaven,
    A name above all others given,
    This matchless name possessing.
    10 And so, when Jesus’ name is called,
    The knees of everyone should falld
    Where’er they are residing.
    11 Then every tongue in one accord,
    Will say that Jesus Christ is Lord,
    While God the Father praising.

  4. Wayne Leman
    Posted April 19, 2005 at 9:50 pm | Permalink

    The ISV words what its translators consider original biblical language poetry as English poetry. Here is a good example from Phil. 2:

    6 In God’s own form existed he,
    And shared with God equality,
    Deemed nothing needed grasping.

    7 Instead, poured out in emptiness,
    A servant’s form did he possess,
    A mortal man becoming.
    In human form he chose to be,

    8 And lived in all humility,
    Death on a cross obeying.

    9 Now lifted up by God to heaven,
    A name above all others given,
    This matchless name possessing.

    10 And so, when Jesus’ name is called,
    The knees of everyone should fall
    Where’er they are residing.

    11 Then every tongue in one accord,
    Will say that Jesus Christ is Lord,
    While God the Father praising.

  5. Kevin P. Edgecomb
    Posted March 13, 2008 at 8:54 pm | Permalink

    That’s not poetry, that’s doggerel. It’s awful. It’s unreadable and demeans the original and the subject matter!

    This is one of those things that John Hobbins and I, among others, harp upon. If translators are going to attempt elevated language in the target language reflecting elevated language in the original, they need to be very well skilled in both languages.

  6. Jonathan Gabriel
    Posted November 26, 2011 at 6:36 pm | Permalink

    Do you know of any comprehensive review of ISV 2.0?

  7. Posted November 30, 2011 at 4:50 am | Permalink

    Jonathan asked:

    Do you know of any comprehensive review of ISV 2.0?

    I don’t, Jonathan. I suspect there won’t be any until ISV 2.0 is published.

  8. Doug Warkentin
    Posted December 4, 2012 at 12:42 am | Permalink

    I disagree that Philippians 2 poetry is doggerel. In the original it was meant as a means and way to remember what our Lord did for us and it was in similar fashion. Just because it does not tickle our ears does not mean it is wrong or unacceptable. In my years as a pastor and overseas missionary I have found that this method of remembering and memorizing is one of the most useful, which is likely why the early church used it so often. My praise goes to the translators of the ISV for doing their best to bring to our attention what was used and was useful to teach and remember doctrine.

  9. Doug Warkentin
    Posted December 4, 2012 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    Luk 23:34 Jesus kept saying, “Father, forgive them, because they don’t know what they’re doing.”

    Some of the great lessons can be learned from information that has been held back due to incomplete translations. This verse is one of them, teaching us how Jesus “kept saying” “forgive them”! What a beautiful truth for us to learn from. He did not just say it once but kept saying it as He loved us that much! I am blessed and very humbled to know this and want to learn more from Him about this.

  10. Doug Warkentin
    Posted December 25, 2012 at 2:36 am | Permalink

    Once again the ISV brings out of the “storehouse” treasures new and old. The Hebrew (brought out so nicely in the ISV translation) says that “Isaac named it (the new well that “they did not quarrel over”) Rehoboth, because he used to say, “The LORD has enlarged the territory for us. We will prosper in the land.”” So we can see from the words “because he used to say” that Isaac was in the habit of saying to himself, and possibly to those around him, that it was “the LORD who ‘has’ (notice the present tense he used about a future event he was speaking into being) enlarged the territory for us.” These are things within God’s will and positive things. We do well to learn from Isaac to walk into the future speaking positively habitually and seeing God do wonders in and through us.

  11. medunkt
    Posted August 19, 2013 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

    I’ve only just learnt of the ISV. There still seems to be very little in the way of independent assessments of this version, and no detailed review that I have been able to find. This is a pity because the concept as I understand it seems promising.

    I’ve purchased a copy today of ISV version 2.0 from Logos Bible Software for $10 and I’ll have a look at it over the coming weeks.

    I get the impression that the ISV Foundation may be strapped for resources to promote the Bible and to produce print versions.

    The ISV people seem to be associated with an entity I’d never heard of called Davidson Press. The Davidson Press website is far from impressive. It counted 7,889 visitors last time I looked. Its range of publications is very limited and appear to be “fringe appeal only” titles.

    In Davidson’s “company store” there are photos of various ISV printed editions that are supposed to be in the pipeline. But where in the pipeline? The availability of the pending print editions are all “To Be Determined” as are their prices.

    Davidson Press has this to say about its policy to print Bibles for domestic consumption only in the USA:

    “The ISV Bible is now being typeset and will be sent to press soon. After careful consideration, we have decided not to print our books in China or India. China’s recent threats to nuke Los Angeles (where we live) have permanently placed China out of consideration for being a printing source, no matter how inexpensive their labor costs are. And India’s policy of allowing Hindus to murder Christians and their families with impunity also puts India out of consideration for being a printing source.”

    Yes, you did read that correctly. No need to reach for stronger reading glasses.

    You can see more here: http://davidsonpress.com/companystore/index.htm


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